Fire Up Your Writing for Fall

As we move into a new season, whether in the northern or southern hemisphere, it’s time to rekindle, rejuvenate and regenerate our creative flames backgroundwriting fire. We want to make an impact with our writing. We want to move and inspire our readers. Yet our own passionate and inspirational writing juices may not be flowing. How do we kick-start ourselves into that wondrous space where ideas are popping so fast that we barely have time to write them down? How do we find that infinite flow of writing with non-stop ease and excitement?

One of the easiest ways to recapture that super creative state is to read what our writing colleagues and favorite authors have to say about why they write and the process of writing. Dipping into another writer’s life, even for a few minutes a day, can remind you of the joys of being a writer and the importance of your own words. It can feed your creative fire.

Here are a few quotes to get you started:
“Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.” — Anne Lamott in Bird by Bird

“The greatest part of a writer’s time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over a half a library to make one book.” – Samuel Johnson

“Who can fathom the idea of putting stamps on the 122nd envelope and sending a manuscript off again? Yet that’s what Robert M. Pirsig did. His was a book (“Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance”) that 121 editors thought could bind no market. Yet millions of readers feel that he wrote it just for them. Your project may not be for everybody. That doesn’t mean it isn’t richly worth the time you are going to spend on it today.” – Susan Shaughnessy in Walking on Alligators, A Book of Meditations for Writers

“Writing practice brings us back to the uniqueness of our own minds and an acceptance of it. We all have wild dreams, fantasies, and ordinary thoughts. Let us feel the texture of them and not be afraid of them. Writing is still the wildest thing I know.”
― Natalie Goldberg in Wild Mind: Living the Writer’s

Some of these books, you may have read, but they can be read numerous times and always provide you with heart-felt inspiration to continue or re-start you writing projects. They model what we all want – a feeling of connection and a feeling of self-recognition. This is what they encourage in us when we sit down to write.

After all, our greatest gift in our writing is the power of the life force flowing through us on to that blank page. Do whatever it takes to feed that force into expression.

What are some of your favorite inspirational writing books?

Comments 1

  • Fall is here in Minnesota and I’m feeling as scattered as the leaves that whirl around my feet as I walk the dog. Thank you for suggesting inspirational books. I need this now.

    Currently I’m reading “Telling True Stories.” It is described as a nonfiction writer’s guide with contributions from many authors. (Plume) I’ve already dog-eared and maimed numerous pages so I can return and savor the wisdom.

    Here’s a quote from Katherine Lanpher:

    “Stories are the connective tissue of the human race, whether you are dissecting a school levy or SouthKorean politics. At the heart of every issue is a human element that leads to the three most beautiful words in the English language: ‘What Happened next?’ If you answer that question, you are a storyteller.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *